New YA Book is now LIVE!

The Ghosts of Dark Hollow

My new YA novel, The Ghosts of Dark Hollow, is now LIVE on Amazon in paperback and Kindle.

I’m also doing a FREE physical paperback copy giveaway (first-come basis) in exchange for an honest review. If interested, shoot me an email at exlibrisregina@gmail.com.

The Ghosts of Dark Hollow is the first in a series, The Dark Hollow Chronicles, but it also functions as a stand-alone story. I started this book as a Wattpad story in August 2017. Readers’ responses helped shaped the story and when I completed it in December I was thrilled to have it featured on the paranormal page. It’s currently trending on the Wattpad Hot List.

Because of the overwhelming positive response from readers, I wrote the first draft of the sequel, which you can start reading now on Wattpad. I’ll be updating/editing it daily.

I hope you enjoy my new story which will probably be a three book series. It’s been, and continues to be, a wonderful journey.

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Cover designs by Consuelo Parro

 

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My Foray Into YA Fae

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Wake up, you’re in fairyland.

I don’t think about fairies much: maybe when I see a Maxfield Parrish illustration, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Shakespeare opened and closed the door in my opinion), or hear a classic fairy tale or or read about those two young girls who photographed fairies and convinced everyone they were real (that was really cool btw). But I can’t say I think about fairies in the way I do about…say…vampires or even werewolves as standard literary characters.

After the success of Twilight, Vampires (and werewolves) have of course been done to death in young adult fiction. The necessity for coming up with something new produced a few mermaid series (I can’t help but think of drowning) and fairies—lots and lots of fairy stories.

If I thought of fairies at all it was as a tiny, gentle Tinkerbell creatures, or some scary “wee folk” people in the midst of bad DMT trips describe seeing (I confess to seeing a small elf chipping away at my brain during a bad fever once). But who knew that fairies could be so damn sexy, and mean? Read more

The Louella Parsons of YouTube

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Do tell!

Around Christmas time of this year, I became inadvertently (and obsessively) drawn into a YouTube drama rabbit hole. While I was tuning into my favorite BookTuber’s Mr. Peter Monn, I discovered that the switchboards were flashing with all kinds of drama concerning Peter being accused of nasty things by a young YouTuber provocateur.

Here’s poor Peter in the midst of the chaos:

While lines were marked in the sand and online alliances formed, one name kept popping up as being one of the sources for spreading such vile gossip.

Meet Ms. Karina Kaboom, the Louella Parsons of YouTube.

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Karina, about to dish the dirt (or spill the tea).

Since that dramatic event, things have calmed down and Peter seems back to normal (he posts about four videos a day about his life which is how I know this). I’ve since discovered many of these so-called drama channels, but no one does it better than Karina Kaboom.  She alone has mastered the digital age’s version of Louella Parsons and Hedda Hopper. Read more

Responding to Criticism

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Responding to criticism is something writers are going to have to deal with eventually. How we navigate that response depends on the criticism itself, how we feel about the source of the criticism, and what the emotional tenor of our present mood is when we read that review or tweet. It can hit us in a sore spot and make us react…hmmm…let’s say less than civilly. Read more

How Not to Write a Book

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Recently I’ve been dipping my reading time and my pen into the Young Adult genre. It’s through my obsessive viewing of booktube that I’ve been exposed to some very creative stories in the fantasy and science fiction genre.

Along with that, I’ve been abusing my Amazon prime membership by purchasing many of these books that have gorgeous, colorful hardback covers and dust jackets that look beautiful on my shelves. Since finishing book three of A Song of Fire and Ice, I’m taking a reprieve from adult reads and soaking up some YA loveliness.

Except that it’s not all lovely. Last week I read a heavily hyped YA science fiction adventure novel that is an object lesson in how not to write a book. I won’t mention it by title because its authors have already suffered enough abuse, but the mistakes they made can be a note of caution to every fiction writer. Read more

Good Writing Days

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I think it was Stephen King in his great book “On Writing” who stated something to the effect that if you show up at the same spot and time everyday, the muse will do the same.

Okay, I found the quote. It’s much more articulate than my paraphrase (go figure):

“Don’t wait for the muse. As I’ve said, he’s a hardheaded guy who’s not susceptible to a lot of creative fluttering. This isn’t the Ouija board or the spirit-world we’re talking about here, but just another job like laying pipe or driving long-haul trucks. Your job is to make sure the muse knows where you’re going to be every day from nine ’til noon. or seven ’til three. If he does know, I assure you that sooner or later he’ll start showing up.” Read more

Beware the Plain Girl

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Miss Brody’s “assassin”.

There is a type of girl in literature and in life you should be aware of: let’s call her the plain girl. She’s the girl who gets passed over for dates and leading roles in the school play, and on the surface she seems okay with it. Whether conscious or not, the society around her has written her off. She’s not beautiful, nor even youthfully vivacious, just kind of blah. Other girls don’t mind her because she’s no threat, guys look through her or maybe treat her like “one of the guys”, or just ask her nicely to get the coffee. And she does. Oh, the plain girl plays the game while the whole time she is plotting her revenge. When the plain girl sees her opportunity to deliver the coup de grace at a deserving rival, she takes it with  deadly precision.

Remember the classic “The Prime of Miss Jane Brody” when one of the star teacher’s little girls destroys her  life in one deadly revelation? Miss Brody the career teacher, collapsing in her classroom after being fired, screams after her young pupil, “ASSASSIN!” Read more

Long Live Rock!

Writing is a solitary, at times lonely, occupation, which is probably why I decided recently to start a rock band. It’s been one of those things I wanted to do for years, so why not do it while I still have all my joints intact?

I’ve always loved rock and roll (I refuse to call it by that farty moniker classic rock) and I consider myself fortunate to have grown up during its heyday. Ten years ago I wrote and produced a popular web series about a 1970’s rock band called Gemini Rising. It won a Webby Honoree and was recommended by the Washington Post and the Boston Globe.  I’d like to say it was picked up by HBO, but alas no. It’s still out there, however, to be discovered and enjoyed. I put a lot of heart into the writing of the show and in the original music, and it’s always the artist’s hope that these strong emotions will somehow resonate with an audience. Read more